This film documents the Stop Bengeo Quarry campaign from its early days to the refusal of planning permission by the County Council.

Campaign to Protect Rural England Rural Living Awards 2017

The SBQ campaign has been put forward for the CPRE Rural Living Awards 2017 – Community Award. We believe the campaign has met all the main criteria: * give added value to community life * have something innovative about them * used by all areas and ages of the community * bring the community together * vibrant * provide for continuity. We also meet some of the Environment Award criteria: * promote access to the countryside * celebrate Hertfordshire’s landscapes * enhance the countryside for all to enjoy. Further details about the award can be found here.: http://www.cpreherts.org.uk/awards/rural-living-awards/item/2408-2017-rural-living-awards-get-underway

Please find below an extract from the application for the award explaining the reasons for nominating Stop Bengeo Quarry.

Stop Bengeo Quarry campaign group has been very successful in energising people of all ages to fight the application and encouraged use of the field – so successful that HCC’s Development Control Committee voted unanimously to reject a slightly reduced version of the original application, at a packed meeting at County Hall on March22nd 2017.

The field in question – Bengeo Field – has a footpath across it which links Bengeo and the whole of Hertford with the villages of Crouchfields and Chapmore End. For generations it has been used and enjoyed by walkers, joggers, cyclists, dogwalkers, and birdwatchers. lt is home to skylarks, brown hares and badgers and it was our aim, not only to preserve the space for future generations, but to foster in local people a love of this piece of countryside and the wildlife which inhabits it.

Stop Bengeo Quarry worked in various ways to raise awareness of the gravel application and to harness the enthusiasm, energy and expertise of hundreds of people – and to raise money for the campaign. Among other things, we held three public meetings; distributed posters for display in windows; organised a Fun Day on the school fieldj programmed family field walks to musical events at a Chapmore End pub; held photo- and cake-making competitions; adopted “The Lonely Oak”, a single oak tree in the middle of the footpath as a symbol of the campaign and, days before the DCC meeting, we encouraged children, parents and grandparents to spell out “NO” with their bodies in a field over-looking the site. We used a drone to photograph this and it made the front page in the Hertfordshire Mercury.

Crucially, we used social media in the form of the Stop Bengeo quarry Facebook and website to communicate with our supporters, to collect their campaign ideas and to publish photos and short films of our events and of the changing beauty of the field during the year. This site attracted over 3,000 followers, many of them local, but also others who had moved away from Hertford and still had fond memories of the field and the activities they had enjoyed there during childhood. Our website was visited more than 11,000 times before the March decision was made.

We were fortunate to find, within the community of Bengeo, several experts who made an enormous contribution to our campaign. These included a graphics designer, a professional photographer, a retired BBC film maker and a distinguished geologist who understood and explained to local residents, to school children and to the councillors on the Development Control Committee, that the proposed excavation would present a threat to the safety of Hertford’s water supply.

We made many new friends and we all learned a lot – not least, how much we loved and valued the beauty of the field.